Navigation

WaterpaintingA long time ago, I was asked by the Whitechapel Gallery, London, to contribute an artwork for the Bigger Splash Benefit Auction, to raise funds for their public programme. Each invited artist was supplied with watercolour paints, paper and brushes.

I wondered what kind of watercolours would collectors of contemporary art like? Of course, they like what other collectors like them like. I thought, what paintings are popular? Gary Hume paintings are very, very popular. I decided to make two Gary Hume-like watercolours, copies of images reproduced in the catalogue of the Whitechapel exhibition in 1999; from his Water Painting series.

Like this one (left) since 2000 in the Tate Collection

Following his usual practice, Hume linear-traced silhouettes of women from found photographic imagery onto aluminium, offsets and superimposes them, then paints flat, high-key, household gloss monochrome grounds. The outlines float, flicker and ripple, producing his familiar seductive, sexy, paintings. I extended the process by tracing photographic reproduction of the paintings from the Whitechapel catalogue, transferred them to paper, masked the wiry tracings, and then laid down flat-wash watercolour backgrounds. Water Painting mutations.

SunlightI've been working as part of Critical Practice towards Differently Screening 4: SUNLIGHT: energy labour value

It's a screening and discussion powered by the Electric Pedals Cinema. The Cinema harnesses the energy from 6 adults pedalling bikes-on-stands-connected-to-generators, which enables the audience to be part of the entertainment as they power the screening.

7 pm - 9 pm Wednesday 10th December 2014
Open School East
The Rose Lipman Building
43 De Beauvoir Road
London N1 5SQ

Join Critical Practice and Open School East to generate energy, a cinema screening and discussion (with beer and bread) on sustainable labour, value and energy, on cinema, love, property and theft.

Truth is Concrete

5.30 - 8.00pm Tuesday 25th November

The Green Room at Chelsea College of Arts, 16 John Islip Street, London, SW1P 4JU

As part of an insurgent research group, on Tuesday 11th November we visited MayDay Rooms in London. We heard from Anthony Davies and Ian Boal (two of the co-founders) about the need they felt for a shared space; where dominant political narratives - like austerity measures, could be countered, where radical histories can be reactivated and extended, and archives of dissent constructed.

In Spring 2011, MayDay Rooms circulated a manifesto.

Sonic Possible Worlds

 

Sunlight

6.30, 9th December 2014, Nottingham Contemporary

I participated in a book launch: Salomé Voegelin's - Sonic Possible Worlds: Hearing the Continuum of Sound hosted by CRISAP on Wednesday 17th September, 18:00-20:30 at the Podium Lecture Theatre at the London College of Communication

 
'Sound is like a dream, fleeting and difficult to remember and describe. Sonic Possible Worlds is a grand tour through the depths of ways of listening and responding' - Pauline Oliveros, Deep Listening Institute.
 

 

The evening began with readings by the Salomé, followed by a conversation with Angus Carlyle, around the possibilities opened by Sonic Possible Worlds for field recording and sound art; for a politics of listening and for the sound of unicorns.

Then there were responses to the book from Daniela Cascella, and myself, with a drinks reception afterwards.

The central thesis of Sonic Possible Worlds, is that at present traditional musical compositions and contemporary sonic outputs are approached through separate and distinct critical languages and histories. As a consequence, no continuous and comparative study of the fields are possible. In Sonic Possible Worlds, Salome proposes a new analytical framework to investigate works across genres and times.

Here's my response

From the 7th  - July 8, 2014, I took part in a workshop Curating the Activist Object at the May Day Rooms, 88 Fleet Street, London EC4Y 1DH

A wave of political uprising in recent years has made visible the inventiveness and creativity that characterises the material culture of contemporary social movements and political activism.

In June, as part of Critical Practice, I co-organised a one-day workshop to host political philosopher Stephen Wright. In preparation for the workshop we formed a Reading Group and collectively read and discussed Towards a Lexicon of Usership (pdf)

At the marathon seminar, we explored the transformative potential of Stephen's ideas of usership, escapology, gleaning, slackspace, spectatorship, working on a 1:1 scale and much else besides. We contributed to the 'retooling of the conceptual lexicon' for producing contemporary art and its institutions.

Truth is ConcreteOver twenty years ago I edited a book Reading Things, it's long, long out of print, although an extract from the introduction was recently republished in The Object, edited by Anthony Hudek, produced by the Whitechapel and MIT Press, 2014.

With my recent interest in Stephen Wright's provocation Towards a Lexicon of Usership, maker libraries and fab-labs, I thought to publish a version of the introductionReading Things: the alibi of use here.

[..] The substance of our material culture, refracted through our advertising media, is an increasingly dominant site for the struggle to represent an individuals most powerful desires, aspirations and fears. In industrial countries, we are constantly encouraged to associate and identify, both physically and psychologically, with a bewildering range of things. From Tampax to Trade sanctions, these consumer choices - if media theory is to be believed - may embody the last remaining coherent space of personal and cultural representation. [..]

More things can happen than will, or have

Composite transcript CompDoc 25-96473fz36-3541 (fragments): Chelsea centenary celebrations 2063. See the original document

– live thread recall Prof. Neil Cummings

Neil Cummings

 

 

[....]

And then, in 2’31, in the blink of an eye, the spectacular roller-coaster ride of the Guggenheim Foundation was over. The Guggenheim Abu Dhabi, the cluster in New York, Venice, Bilbao Helsinki, and the Deutsche – Guggenheim in Berlin, in Shanghai and Rio, together with the unfinished project in Moscow, were all taken into UN-Multitude stewardship.

The demise of the Guggenheim, the concomitant collapse of the Singularity market , forced other private museums into stewardship.

They all filed for Chapter 12 protection.

It was a spectacular reverse of resource flows, tens of thousands of art works poured into public collections from previously private institutions.

An ethic of public generosity was re-animated, even encouraged.

Everyone benefited.

images

Villa Arson, NiceIglesia del Santa SepulchroCollaborative mappingBoadilla babesAbandoned houseDaniel expert 1